Girls & Boys Lacrosse program for grades K-8 in Pembroke MA

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Girls only require 3 pieces of equipment to play lacrosse:

  • Stick
  • Goggles
  • Mouthguard

Gloves and headgear are optional.

 

Below we provide an overview of what to consider at each age level and then more detail about each piece of equipment. Finding the best lacrosse stick for your game will come down to being prepared in advance with the right information. But the more you play and get a feel for what best fits your style, the closer you will be to finding that perfect combination.

 

GEAR OVERVIEW

U8 (K -2) – Catching and throwing in lacrosse can be very tough to pick up and it can turn girls off early on if they can’t master this. Make sure to cut her shaft to the right size and this will help her pick up and enjoy the sport in her earliest years (see below for how to measure her shaft).*

U10 (3/4) – Upgrading from a beginner stick at this age can really help improve her game. The Exult 300 or Crux 300 by STX are great next level sticks. They have a forgiving pocket and a flat scoop, which makes it easier to pick up ground balls.

U12 (5/6) – This is the time to look into specialized intermediate sticks. At this age if your daughter knows she wants to focus on a specific position, there are sticks and heads that will help her improve her game. Attack and Middie stick heads will be more pinched to protect the ball from wobbling and the head will be more curved to provide greater accuracy when shooting. Defenders will look for a wider and flatter head, which is better for checking and picking up ground balls.

U14 (7/8) – At this age, if your daughter has been playing for a while, she has likely tried a few different heads and shafts and will know what she prefers.

If your daughter is new to lacrosse and starting at U10, 12 or even 14, we’d recommend starting with a starter stick or a defense stick so she can better master the basics.

 

GEAR DETAILS

Lacrosse Sticks

When looking for a stick, you can either purchase a premade model which comes fully assembled or you can build your own. For Beginners we recommend the premade model and as your player gets more involved in the sport, they may choose to build their own tailored to fit their needs.

Beginner Sticks

STX Lilly Mesh ($29.99)

String King Complete Junior ($69.99)

STX Crux 100 Starter Package ($79) – comes with stick, goggles, bag

STX Exult 200 Starter Package ($79) – comes with stick, goggles, bag

 

Intermediate Sticks

STX Crux 400 on Exult 300 Complete Stick ($109.99) – good Offensive stick

STX Exult 300 on 7075 Complete Stick ($99)  - good Middie stick

STX Fortress 300 on 70775 Complete Stick ($89.99) – good Defensive stick

 

Advanced Sticks

String King Complete 2 Pro ($219) - comes in Midfield, Offense or Defense

Maverick Ascent ($219.99)– Middie stick

Under Armour Glory Complete Stick ($214.99) – top notch Offensive stick

STX Fortress 600 (4124.99)– top notch Defensive stick

 

If you have a stick head you like but your shaft is too short – just buy a new shaft!

And if your stick head needs to be restrung, go to Legit Lacrosse in Hanover. They can do it while you wait (if it’s not too busy!)

 

Lacrosse Shafts

There are a variety of materials to consider when choosing your stick’s shaft:

  • Aluminum Alloy – Heavy and durable, these shafts are a popular choice for beginners. They can be affected by temperature more than other shafts, however, so you will need tape or gloves to handle the stick in colder weather.
  • Titanium Alloy – These shafts are lightweight, so they won’t slow you down on the field, but they also have the strength needed to play defense. Titanium alloy is a solid option for advanced players.
  • Scandium Alloy – These shafts are extremely durable for long-lasting performance and strength. Their lightweight design allows for faster movement and greater agility. This is the choice of many elite and pro-level players.
  • Carbon Fiber/Composite – These are the lightest of the lacrosse stick shafts. They are a popular option for experienced players and can allow for quick stick work. But because they are so lightweight, they can be difficult to use for younger players who have not yet mastered their handling.

The grip of your lacrosse shaft is also very important. It will either be coated or have a grip pattern to improve handling. Greater grip makes for less slippage while shooting or going for ground balls.

The coating on a beginner’s stick is usually shiny and can be slippery and harder to handle in rain or cold weather. A good option to customize a starter stick is to add grip tape, this can also help girls remember where to put their hands on the stick for optimal performance.

The shape of the shaft can also play a part in how well you handle it. The octagon and soft octagon are both common shaft shapes, but you will also find concave octagon and teardrop shafts. Your choice will come down to what fits best in your daughters hands.

*What is the right size for a girls shaft?

Measure along the length of the players arms to know how much to cut. The shaft should run from the tip of your daughters fingers to their armpit. An inch or two can be added to account for height increase, so you’re not buying a new stick after every growth spurt. A girls shaft can be no smaller than 35.5 inches and no more than 43.25 inches. Goalie sticks can be up to 52 inches long. Shafts can be cut with a hacksaw at home. Just take off the rubber end cap, cut the stick and put the rubber end back on.

 

Lacrosse Heads

The width of the lacrosse head can have an impact on your performance, and depending on your position on the field, you may choose a wider or narrower head.

Attack/Middie: Typically would prefer a more pinched head to prevent the ball from bouncing around when they cradle. This also makes it harder for a defender to check. Attackers also prefer a more flexible head, as they are typically more lightweight and make it easier to maneuver. Lastly an attacker would typically prefer a curved or rounded scoop, something more in the shape of a “U”, which can help with accuracy when passing and shooting.

Defense: Tends to prefer a wider/flatter head to help when checking and scooping the ball after a successful check. Defenders also trend towards a stiffer head, which is heavier, but holds up better during physical play.

Beginners typically choose a wider head, as it makes it easier to catch, throw and cradle the ball.

 

Lacrosse Goggles

Effective January 1, 2020 all eyewear must be SEI certified to the current ASTM F3077 standard and listed on the SEI website (SEI Link) to be legal for play for the 2020 season, for both youth and high school level play.

At the Youth level, the eyewear worn on the field must be SEI certified and listed on the SEI site and must have the SEI mark of certification for the 2020 season.

For a list of products that meet the F3077 standard and are SEI certified, click here and use the pull-down menu for US Lacrosse and look under Eye Protection for Women’s Lacrosse.

 

SEI certified Options:

STX Rookie Goggle ($34.99): This goggle is made for smaller framed faces with increased visibility.

STX 4sight+ (39.99): Offered in both adult and youth sizes. Youth sizes may be tight on a rounder face, so consider sizing up.

Under Armour Futures Goggles ($29.99) - Wraps back a little further for increased visibility

Under Armour Glory Goggles ($79.99)

 

Mouthguards

White and clear mouthguards, as well as mouthguards with graphics of teeth are prohibited.

Other than that, any mouthguard will do.

 

 

WHERE TO BUY YOUR GEAR

 

Local:

  • Legit Lacrosse in Hanover
  • Dicks Sporting Goods in Hanover

 

Online:

  • Dicks Sporting Goods
  • Sportstop.com – Excellent pricing, great customer service and quick delivery (FREE shipping on orders over $49)
  • Lacrosse.com  OR Lax.com– Lacrosse hubs with everything you could need or want 